What to Consider When Selecting Your Builder

When you commit to building a house, you also commit to your builder. You put your trust in someone to manage quite possibly the biggest investment of your life – you rely on them to ensure your house will be built with quality and meet your needs just right.

So, it’s no wonder that choosing a builder isn’t a simple task. What should you look for now that you’ve found ‘the one’?

They’re certified.

The Canadian Home Builders’ Association Nova Scotia offers a Certified Residential Builder program to its members. It teaches a code of ethics, health and safety requirements, and customer service strategies, amongst other important things. It also requires builders to meet a number of standards – including earning a letter of good standing from the Construction Safety Association Nova Scotia – before receiving their Certified Residential Builder designation. If a builder has taken this voluntary course and received their designation, you’ll have a strong indication of their level of commitment to their work.

They have a history of accomplishments.

There are many awards and honors given to homebuilders who go above and beyond to build quality homes and ensure customer satisfaction. The Kohltech Peak Awards, for instance, is hosted annually by the Canadian Home Builders’ Association Nova Scotia to recognize excellence in the residential construction industry. Official winner lists from current and previous years can be found on the association’s >> website.

They can produce realistic references.

Glowing references are nice, and it’s a good sign if a potential builder can direct you to past clients that sing their praises. However, challenges sometimes come up during the homebuilding process – it can help to understand how a builder dealt with those challenges. Ask for a few references that can speak to how they positively addressed a difficult situation.

They have a clearly outlined process.

There are several steps that go into building a home and you need a homebuilder that won’t miss a beat. Talk to potential homebuilders about their building process to get an understanding of how detailed and professional they’ll be if you build with them.

They communicate.

A reputable builder will get back to you in a timely manner and keep you up to date on your home’s progress. If you’re having trouble connecting even before you sign the contract, you might want to consider a builder who prioritizes your concerns.

They’re there for customers even after the build is done. 

Ask potential builders about their follow-up care and even better – ask their previous clients. When speaking to references, don’t be afraid to inquire about how their builder handled issues after the build. With time, houses settle and defects may appear. This is normal. It’s important to find a builder who addresses these situations efficiently and professionally.

With a bit of research, you should be able to find a builder you feel comfortable with – and if not, keep researching until you do.

Kaila Sawlor Sawlor Built Homes Custom Home Builder in Nova Scotia

Kaila Sawlor-Dion

Kaila is the Marketing Manager of Sawlor Built Homes. She continuously updates our profile on Facebook, Instagram, Houzz, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest, and is focused on all marketing initiatives.

A third generation family member of Sawlor Built Homes, Kaila joined the company in 2011. She is an active member of the Canadian Home Builder's Association - Nova Scotia Marketing Committee and she continues to update her education and training, intent on becoming an industry leader in new home marketing.


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